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Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

ANCIENT GREEK CULTURE

[From: Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]

Asclepios - Atlas - Boreas - Charites - Cybele - Dryads - Eos - Erinyes - Eros - Gaea - Gigantes - Gorgons - Hades - Harpies - Hebe - Helios - Hermaphroditus - Hestia - Horae - Iris - Kronos - Maenads - Moirai - Muses - Naiads - Nereids - Nereus - Nymphs - Oceanides - Oceanos - Pan - Persephone - Priapus - Prometheus - Rhea - Satyrs - Seilenoi - Seilenos - Selene - Themis - Thetis - Triton - Zephyros

Horae

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Horae [Hours] - These were the secondary deities, three in number, associated and often confounded with the Graces. Daughters of Zeus and Themis, they were named Eunomia, Dike, and Eirene. Eunomia signified good order, Dike justice and fairness, and Eirene peace, names which showed that the divinities of the three ordinary seasons of the world of nature were also, as daughters of Themis, appointed to superinted the moral world of human life. Eventually in the Hellenistic age, the Horae were modified to become the personification of the seasons, and as a result increased in number to four, and each acquired a new realm of responsibility. Later still, they became even more numerous to arrive at something like the hour of the present day. In Athens especially the Horae were initially two in number known as Carpo and Thallo who were associated with the sun and Apollo. [p. 49]

[Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]




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