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Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

ANCIENT GREEK CULTURE

[From: Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]

Asclepios - Atlas - Boreas - Charites - Cybele - Dryads - Eos - Erinyes - Eros - Gaea - Gigantes - Gorgons - Hades - Harpies - Hebe - Helios - Hermaphroditus - Hestia - Horae - Iris - Kronos - Maenads - Moirai - Muses - Naiads - Nereids - Nereus - Nymphs - Oceanides - Oceanos - Pan - Persephone - Priapus - Prometheus - Rhea - Satyrs - Seilenoi - Seilenos - Selene - Themis - Thetis - Triton - Zephyros

Themis

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The daughter of Ouranos and Gaea, she was one of the six Titanesses. Pindar however relates that she was the first wife of Zeus. She became the councilor of Zeus and represented the ideal of justice. She is variably known as the mother of the Horae and of the Fates. Homer treats her as the personification of law and order that impose justice. She was also accredited with prophetic powers and had an oracle at Delphi, before it was superseded by that of Apollo. In art she is depicted holding the scales of justice and a sword with her eyes blindfolded, representative of the fairness of her judgment. [p. 55]

[Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]




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