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Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

ANCIENT GREEK CULTURE

[From: Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]

Asclepios - Atlas - Boreas - Charites - Cybele - Dryads - Eos - Erinyes - Eros - Gaea - Gigantes - Gorgons - Hades - Harpies - Hebe - Helios - Hermaphroditus - Hestia - Horae - Iris - Kronos - Maenads - Moirai - Muses - Naiads - Nereids - Nereus - Nymphs - Oceanides - Oceanos - Pan - Persephone - Priapus - Prometheus - Rhea - Satyrs - Seilenoi - Seilenos - Selene - Themis - Thetis - Triton - Zephyros

Triton

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God of the sea and son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, a relatively new divinity in Greece, he is mentioned for the first time in the Theogony of Hesiod. His origin was probably Libya. Half man, half fish, with two tails, he assisted Poseidon in the war of the Giants. By blowing his trumpet he spread terror among the enemies of the gods through the loud blasts, thus forcing them to flee. The Greeks accredited him also with prophetic powers and he helped both Heracles and Jason in moments of danger. Unique in the early period, with the passage of time Triton was multiplied manifold until finally his name was associated with numerous monsters of the deep who together with the Nereids formed the retinue of Poseidon. The later Tritons had many of the traits of the Satyrs and just as with the latter who pursued the Nymphs, so the Tritons were attracted to the Nereids. [p. 55]

[Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.]




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