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Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

ELEMENTS

Shade

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Comparative Darkness . . . . The Degree of Darkness of a color determined by the lack of illumination or quantity of darkness. . . . A Slight Degree, Small Amount . . . . To Change by imperceptible degrees, To Reduce by way of a concession., To Pass or change by slight gradations, as one color, quality, or thing into another. . . . To Obscure, Dim, or Darken, Screen or hide from view. . . . To Protect, Cover, Screen . . . . A Relatively Dark Area, Place or Area [of comparative darkness] . . . . Sheltered, Secluded or Obscure Place . . . . Anything used for protection against excessive light, heat, etc . . . . A Shadow . . . .

The representation of values in a painting or drawing. . . . To introduce degrees of darkness into [a drawing or painting] in order to render light and shadow or give the effect of color. . . . .to render the values of light and dark on [a drawn figure, object, etc.]. esp. in order to create an illusion of three-dimensionality

Implies partial darkness or something less bright than the surroundings. Shade indicates the lesser brightness and heat of an area where the direct rays of light do not fall

C O N S I D E R:
Shade is descriptive of a degree of variation in color--for example, a lighter or darker shade of ink, a more reddish shade of purple. In any system of color gradation, a step in the scale may be called a shade. [Mayer, Ralph. The Painter's Craft. An Introduction to Artist's Methods and Materials. Revised and updated by Steven Sheehan, Director of the Ralph Mayer Center, Yale University School of Art. New York: Penquin Group. 1948. 1991. p. 29]


R  E  F  E  R  E  N  C  E  S 
Shade n. 1. a comparative darkness caused by the interception of rays of light. 2. a place or an area of comparative darkness, as one sheltered from the sun: Let's sit in the shade. 3. See window shade. 4. a lampshade. 5. shades, a. gathering darkness: shades of night b. Slang. sunglasses. c. a reminder of something: shades of the Inquisition 6. Usually, shades. a secluded or obscure place. 7. comparative obscurity. 8. a specter or ghost. 9. Gk. and Rom. Religion. one of the spirits of the dead inhabiting Hades. 10. a shadow. 11. the degree of darkness of a color, determined by the quantity of black or by the lack of illumination. 12. [in pictorial representation and photography] comparative darkness; a relatively dark area. 13. a slight degree. 14. a small amount; touch. 14. anything used for protection against excessive light, heat, etc. 16. the shades, Hades, as the abode of the spirits of the dead. -v.t. 17. to produce shade in or on. 18. to obscure, dim, or darken. 19. to screen or hide from view. 20. To protect [something] from light, heat, etc., by or as by a screen. 21. to cover or screen [a candle, light, etc.] 22. Fine Arts. a. to introduce degrees of darkness into [a drawing or painting] in order to render light and shadow or give the effect of color. b. to render the values of light and dark on [a drawn figure, object, etc.]. esp. in order to create an illusion of three-dimensionality. 23. to change by imperceptible degrees. 24. to reduce [the price of something] by way of a concession. -v.i. 25. to pass or change by slight gradations, as one color, quality, or thing into another. [ME; OE sceadu; see Shadow; c. G. Schatten, Goth skadus, GK sk÷tos] -Syn. 1. Gloom, Dusk, Shade, Shadow imply partial darkness or something less bright than the surroundings. Shade indicates the lesser brightness and heat of an area where the direct rays of light do not fall: the shade of a tree It differs from Shadow in that it implies no particular form or definite limit, whereas shadow often refers to the form or outline of the object that intercepts the light: the shadow of a dog 8. apparition, phantom, spirit. 14. trace, hint, suggestion. 15. veil, screen. 18. cloud, blur, obfuscate. 19. conceal, shelter. -Ant. 1. light, glare.

Shading. n. 1. a slight variation or difference of color, character, etc. 2. the act of a person or thing that shades. 3. the representation of values in a painting or drawing.

[Urdang, Laurence, ed. Random House Dictionary of The English Language. New York: Random House,1968.]




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