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Notebook

Notebook, 1993-

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"By 6000 B.C. there could be little doubt that the new civilizations transplanted into Italy during the previous century had taken root. Two major areas of culture had definitely emerged, one Greek, the other Etruscan; the third prospective centre then forming in Latium had as yet hardly had the occasion to assert itself in a manner noticeable by all. Certainly at this stage the colonial Greek and the Etruscan appear as the two most active exponents of the new Italian culture. Both had then begun to organize and exploit their respective territories; and already it could be seen that each group did so in its own characteristic way. Thus two cultural blocs of unmistakable individuality had come into being and started to move and grow, each on its own momentum. In this respect the resulting situation bears much likeness to the more recent history of the western hemisphere, where a similar colonial drive, originating in Europe, also caused the rise of two quite unequal and in effect novel civilizations in the new continent: one North American; the Other Latin, Central and South American. In much the same way it can be said that by 600, when the new civilization of Italy came of age, the domains of the Etruscans and of the Greek colonizers had become two distinct countries. Each owed its existence to the westward expansion of the ancient Mediterranean civilization: this much they had in common . . . . " - [
Etruscan]




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Thomas Eakins . . . . Sir Charles Lock Eastlake . . . . Echidna . . . . Umberto Eco . . . . Economists . . . . Educators . . . . Efé Pygmies of Zaïre's Ituri Forest . . . . The Eight . . . . The Art of the Elamites . . . . Electra . . . . T. S. Eliot . . . . Richard Ellmann . . . . Emerson . . . . English Proverbes . . . . Enlil . . . . James Ensor . . . . Epicurus . . . . Eos [Aurora] . . . . Ereshkigal . . . . Erinyes [Furies] . . . . Max Ernst [1891-1976] . . . . Eros [Cupid] . . . . Etruscan . . . . Euclid . . . . Eudoxus . . . . Euphony . . . . Euphranor of Corinth . . . . Europa . . . . Eutychides . . . . Eurydice . . . . Euxdoxus . . . . Execias




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